• Sarah Morris works in the parallel mediums of painting and film, using both to explore what she has called “urban, social, and bureaucratic typologies.” Her paintings, allover geometric compositions executed in household gloss paint, refer to motifs, palettes, and rhythms of global cities; her fourteen films in turn offer non-narrative portraits of cities that emerge through rigorous editing of their architectures, protagonists, and processes. This exhibition offers the first complete presentation of Morris’s filmic output anywhere in the world, shown here in a sequence of custom-built spaces arrayed throughout the former factory chamber of UCCA’s Great Hall and framed by a cycle of monumental new wall paintings. It is presented exactly twenty years after she shot her first film, Midtown (1998) in her home city of New York, and ten years after she filmed Beijing, with the exclusive permission of the International Olympic Committee, during the 2008 Games. Taken together, the films, which focus on cities from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles, from Paris to Hamburg, and from Rio de Janeiro to Abu Dhabi, capture and comment on the massive economic and geopolitical transformations that have unfolded during the first two decades of the twenty-first century.

    “Xie Nanxing: Spices” presents a new series of seven major oil paintings created in the last two years, reflecting a shift in the artist’s thinking away from his earlier attempts to mediate between realism and conceptualism, in favor of a more objective search for the roots of his artistic practice. In these works, common tropes and references from Western art history and techniques developed by old masters are deftly handled, obliquely or ambiguously brought onto the canvas. The enlightenment narrative that has undergirded contemporary painting in China throughout the past several decades of rapid development is expressed here as the confusion and complexity that lies between two vastly different visual and historical contexts. This exhibition is less a summary or an argument than a timely corrective: Xie Nanxing views his own stubborn “misreadings” of the Western classical tradition in the same vein as Columbus mistaking the tree bark he found in the Americas for Indian spices. The exhibition will also include sketches and supplementary materials that elucidate Xie’s creative trajectory.


    Chang Yun-han excels at transforming what language cannot capture—her relationship with art history, the art system, and unfamiliar environments, as well as the feelings brought on by these relationships—into images. Here, a brief sojourn in New York provides the context for her transformations. Her new work looks at the cultural predicament in an era of increasingly sluggish globalization. Two New Yorks—one seen, one imagined—are joined together, and put into a relationship with the “real” New York that is at once close and distant.

    About The “New Directions”
    Initiated in 2015, the “New Directions” series offers some of China’s most promising young artists a platform to realize their first institutional solo exhibition and monographic publication. Deepening UCCA’s ongoing commitment to emerging practices pioneered by shows including “The New Normal” (2017), “ON|OFF” (2013), “Breaking Forecast” (2009), and the “Curated By…” series (2010-2012), New Directions aims to present, through a constellation of singular positions, an overall sense of the richness and complexity of new art in China today.


    UCCA
    +86 10 5780 0200
    uccastore@ucca.org.cn
    798 Art Zone,No. 4 Jiuxianqiao Road,Chaoyang District,Beijing


  • Sarah Morris (b. 1967, England, lives and works in New York) has presented solo exhibitions at the Espoo Museum of Modern Art (Finland, 2017); Kunsthalle Wien (2016); Kunsthalle Bremen (2013); M-Museum Leuven (2015); Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus, Ohio, 2012); Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (Dusseldorf, 2010); Museum für Moderne Kunst (Frankfurt, 2009); Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna (2009); Lenbachhaus (Munich, 2008); Fondation Beyeler (Basel, 2008); Museum Boijmans van Beuningen (Rotterdam, 2006); Kestner Gesellschaft (Hannover, 2005); Palais de Tokyo (Paris, 2005); Moderna Museet (Stockholm, 2005); Kunstforeningen (Copenhagen, 2004); Hamburger Bahnhof (Berlin, 2001); Kunsthalle Zürich (2000); and Modern Art Oxford (1999). Her work has also been included in the São Paulo Biennial (2002) and the Tate Triennial (2003), and has been collected by museums including Centre Pompidou; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; MoMA; Museum für Moderne Kunst (Frankfurt); Neue Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof (Berlin); Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Tate Modern.

    Xie Nanxing (b. 1970, Chongqing, lives and works in Beijing and Chengdu) has been widely exhibited since 1999. Selected solo exhibitions include “untitled: 3 ×” (Galerie Urs Meile, Beijing, 2016); and “Xie Nanxing Paintings” (Kunstverein Harburger Bahnhof, Hamburg, 2005). Group exhibitions include: “The Latch” (C-Space+Local, Beijing, 2017); “China 8” (Kunsthalle Recklinghausen, 2015); “New Works #1” (OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen, 2014); and “Our Future: The Guy & Myriam Ullens Foundation Collection” (UCCA, Beijing, 2008). Xie’s work has also been shown in major periodic exhibitions including Documenta XII (Kassel, 2007); and the 48th Venice Biennale (1999).

    Chang Yun-han (b. 1985, Changhua, Taiwan,China lives and works in Taipei) graduated with an M.F.A. in sculpture from the National Taiwan University of Arts. Her solo exhibition “You Are Not What You Think You Are” was held at the Taipei Contemporary Art Center in 2015. Major group exhibitions include: “Live Ammo” (Taipei Contemporary Art Center, 2011); the 2010 Taipei Biennial (Taipei Fine Arts Museum); and the finalists exhibition for the 2009 Taipei Arts Award (Taipei Fine Arts Museum).


    UCCA
    +86 10 5780 0200
    uccastore@ucca.org.cn
    798 Art Zone,No. 4 Jiuxianqiao Road,Chaoyang District,Beijing